Simont Braun assisted Rewe in one of the largest mergers in the European retail sector

Simont Braun has advised Rewe, the second largest German supermarket chain, on the Belgian legal aspects of the purchase of Lekkerland/Conway, a major wholesaler specialised in consumption on the go, supplying gas stations, kiosks, convenience stores, etc. The transaction was signed on 28 May 2019 and the parties are now waiting for clearance by the competition authorities.

As both Rewe Group and Lekkerland are active in several European countries, their merger implied substantial cross-border aspects and the active cooperation of several top tier law firms, principally in Germany (lead), Belgium, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Spain.

Simont Braun’s Corporate M&A team advised Rewe on the Belgian legal aspects of the transaction, in particular by carrying out a legal due diligence on the Belgian target companies and assisted on the related legal and regulatory questions surrounding the transaction.

Our team is delighted to have contributed to such a landmark European cross-border transaction, in close cooperation with Taylor Wessing Germany (lead firm). Our demonstrated capabilities to act in the framework of international transactions make us a go-to law firm for such matters on the Belgian market. Our integrated multidisciplinary structure and strong linguistic skills were clearly a plus,” highlights Axel Maeterlinck, partner in Simont Braun’s Corporate M&A department.

The Rewe Group generated a turnover over € 61 billion last year, courtesy of its 360,000 employees in 22 European countries. With the merger with Lekkerland, a new European powerhouse is born in the convenience segment. Lekkerland has about 4,900 employees in Europe and generated a turnover of € 12.4 billion euro last financial year. In Belgium, the group operates under the name Conway and its 400 people generate a turnover of € 1.5 billion (source: www.retaildetail.be).

The Simont Braun team was led by partner Axel Maeterlinck, together with partners Fernand de Visscher, Steven Callens and the assistance of counsel Pierre Van Achter and associates Tine Bauwens, Laura Grauer, Julie Kever and Peter Blomme.

New Copyright Directive approved by the EU Parliament

On 26 March 2019, a fierce battle took place in the arena of the EU Parliament. Arguments flowing back and forward resulted in a close majority in favour of the supporters of the new Directive (EU) 2019 of the European Parliament and of the Council on copyright and related rights in the Digital Single Market and amending Directives 96/9/EC and 2001/29/EC (hereinafter: the New Copyright Directive). You may find the debate here and the final text as adopted here.

The fact that the European Commission launched the proposal back in September 2016 with a legislative process lasting nearly two and a half years and only 348 Members of the European Parliament (hereinafter: MEP) voting in favour, while 274 MEP voted against and 36 MEP abstained, illustrates the controversial nature of the New Copyright Directive. This led to the adoption of the current text containing merely 32 articles to be accompanied with almost three times that amount of recitals, i.e. 86.

Closing the value gap

The biggest battle was fought over the new obligations and the personal scope of Online Content-Sharing Service Providers (hereinafter: OCSSP). When reading between the lines of the personal scope, the thresholds and the exemptions, it seems that the new rules on the internet are tailored towards big information society service providers such as YouTube, Facebook and similar platforms. The goal of the New Copyright Directive is clear: the EU only intends to regulate the internet to the extent necessary to tackle the famous “value gap” and ensure appropriate remuneration for rightholders for the use of their protected works on the internet.

Under the New Copyright Directive, an OCSSP means “a provider of information society service of which the main or one of the main purposes is to store and give the public access to a large amount of copyright-protected works or other protected subject matter uploaded by its users, which it organises and promotes for profit-making purposes”.

Despite clear indications, the New Copyright Directive still leaves room for interpretation of this new key concept. It will be interesting to see how courts will define the boundaries and interpret the open notions like “main” and “large”. What is certain, is that activities of providers of services like Wikipedia (online encyclopaedia), Dropbox (online storage), eBay (online marketplace) and Telenet or Belgacom (electronic communication services) are not included in the scope as they are explicitly excluded for the reason that they do not have as their main purpose to give to the public access to a large amount of copyright-protected works.

The new obligations on OCSSP flowing from the New Copyright Directive include amongst others that OCSSP must now obtain an authorisation in exchange for an appropriate remuneration from the rightholders in order to communicate the protected works to the public. In the event that they cannot obtain such authorisation, they must demonstrate best efforts to obtain it, demonstrate best efforts to make unavailable unauthorised content for which relevant and necessary information was provided and organise an expeditious notice, take down and stay down mechanism for unauthorised content. The latter must include an effective and expeditious complaint and redress mechanism with a human review in the event of disputes. At the same time, the OCSSP must refrain from general monitoring and over-blocking.

Other key features of the New Copyright Directive

Besides the above-mentioned, other key features of the New Copyright Directive include:

  • New exceptions and limitations covering text and datamining, the use of works in digital and cross-border teaching activities and copies made for the preservation of cultural heritage
  • Measures to ensure wider access to out-of commerce works by providing the grant of non-exclusive licences to cultural heritage institutions for non-commercial purposes, together with measures to ensure transparency and stakeholder dialogue
  • Measures to facilitate collective licensing and rules governing collective management organisations offering such collective licenses
  • Negotiation mechanism to assist parties facing difficulties related to the licensing of rights for the purpose of making available audiovisual works on VOD platforms
  • New publisher’s rights with regard to online uses of their press publications
  • A right for authors and performers to receive information as well as appropriate and proportionate remuneration when they license or transfer their exclusive rights
  • A right of revocation for authors and performers in case of a lack of exploitation after transferring or licensing their rights on an exclusive basis

Conclusion

The journey is far from over. The Council of Ministers still has to give its final opinion over the New Copyright Directive and it is expected that it will accept the final text on 9 April 2019. After that, the text will be published in the Official Journal and the Member States will have 2 years after the date of entry into force of the directive to transpose it into their national laws.

The rules laid down in this new directive aim at creating a fair balance between access to creative works and appropriate remuneration for the rightholders. It would be in the interest of all stakeholders that users and rightholders come to a mutual understanding and conclude the necessary licenses to keep contents available while at the same time ensuring appropriate remuneration of the rightholders, and ultimately prove the sceptics wrong.

We will keep monitoring the progress of the New Copyright Directive and its implementation and keep you updated.

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Philippe CampoliniPeter Blomme and Christopher Dumont

For any question, do not hesitate to contact the authors:
philippe.campolini@simontbraun.eu – +32 2 533 17 52
peter.blomme@simontbraun.eu  – +32 2 533 17 13
christopher.dumont@simontbraun.eu – +32 2 533 17 58

A drug prescription assistance software can be a medical device

In its judgment dated 7 December 2017 (case C-329/16), the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) considered that software, of which at least one of the functions makes it possible to use patient-specific data for the purposes, inter alia, of detecting contraindications, drug interactions and excessive doses, is, in respect of that function, a medical device within the meaning of the Directive 93/42/EEC concerning medical devices (MDD).

According to the CJEU, software that cross-references patient-specific data with the drugs that the doctor is contemplating prescribing, and is thus able to provide the doctor, in an automated manner, with an analysis intended to detect, in particular, possible contraindications, drug interactions and excessive dosages, is used for the purpose of prevention, monitoring, treatment or alleviation of a disease, and therefore pursues a specifically medical objective, making it a medical device within the meaning of the MDD.

On the contrary, software that, while intended for use in a medical context, has the sole purpose of archiving, collecting and transmitting data, like patient medical data storage software, the function of which is limited to indicating to the doctor providing treatment the name of the generic drug associated with the one he plans to prescribe, or software intended to indicate the contraindications mentioned by the manufacturer of that drug in its instructions for use, does not fall within the scope of the MDD.

The CJEU adds that to assess whether a software is a medical device in the meaning of the MDD, it does not matter whether software acts directly or indirectly on the human body. The essential criterion is that its purpose is specifically one of those set out in the definition of a medical device (such as the diagnosis, prevention, monitoring, treatment or alleviation of disease).

The stakes of the qualification are clear. Any medical device, including software, must compulsorily bear a CE marking of conformity when it is placed on the market. Such marking indicates that the product has been subject to an assessment of its conformity with the requirements of the MDD. As a consequence of such marking, Member States may not create obstacles to the placing of the device on the market. In the case at stake, France imposed an additional national certification obligation on a drug prescription assistance software bearing the CE marking. As a consequence of the CJEU’s judgment, such an obligation must be considered as contrary to the MDD.

The CJEU also clarified that if medical software comprises both modules that meet the definition of the term ‘medical device’ and others that do not meet it and that are not accessories to a medical device, only the former falls within the scope of the MDD and must be marked CE. The manufacturer of such mixed software is required to identify which of the modules constitute medical devices so that the CE marking can be affixed to those modules only.

There is no doubt that this judgment of the CJEU will remain valid under the future legislation, namely the Regulation 2017/745/EU on medical devices (applicable as from 26 May 2020). This Regulation explicitly states that software in its own right, when specifically intended by the manufacturer to be used for one or more of the medical purposes set out in the definition of a medical device (such as the diagnosis, prevention, monitoring, prediction, prognosis, treatment or alleviation of disease), qualifies as a medical device.

For more information on this future legislation, you can contact us or have a look at our previous news: The new legal framework applicable to medical devices

Philippe Campolini: +32 (0)2 533 17 17 or phc@simontbraun.eu
Peter Blomme: +32 (0)2 533 17 13 or pbl@simontbraun.eu

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The Belgian tax treatment of income stemming from the assigment of license of copyrights

Simont Braun recently assisted one of its clients in obtaining a ruling from the Ruling Commission in which an extensive and refined application was made of the interesting Belgian tax treatment with respect to personal income received from the assignment or license of copyrights.

The distinction between the compensation received by an individual in exchange for professional services rendered and the compensation received for assigning or licensing copyrights is made on the basis of a flat percentage (ranging between 5 and 25%).

The specific percentages as accepted by the Ruling Commission for each specific job description are based on a factual analysis of the individual tasks and creativity required for the respective job descriptions, as well as on the market value of the creative results which are protected by copyright.

Full article available in French and Dutch

 

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